Purina Dog Food Recall

March 16th, 2016

Purina recalls wet dog food for possible nutrient deficiencies

Three product lines affected; items were sold across the United States and Canada.

Mar 14, 2016

By dvm360.com staff

DVM360 MAGAZINE

Purina has issued a voluntary recall of three product lines due to possible nutrient deficiencies after internal quality testing found that some 10-oz wet dog food tubs may not contain the recommended level of added vitamins and minerals, according to a company release. The items were manufactured in only one Purina facility and were sold across the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico.

The lines affected are sold under the Beneful Prepared Meals, Beneful Chopped Blends and Pro Plan Savory Meals brands. A full list of recalled product is below:

Beneful Prepared Meals—10-oz tubs

Item name UPC code “Best by” date range Production code range
Beef Stew 17800-10965 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Chicken Stew 17800-12861 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Simmered Beef Entrée 17800-10963 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Simmered Chicken Medley 17800-10964 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Beef & Chicken Medley 17800-12859 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Roasted Chicken Recipe 17800-10764 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Roasted Turkey Medley 17800-10968 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Savory Rice & Lamb Stew 17800-10967 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054

 

Beneful Chopped Blends—10-oz tubs

Item name UPC code “Best by” date range Production code range
With Beef, Carrots Peas & Barley 17800-15494 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
With Chicken, Carrots, Peas & Wild Rice 17800-15496 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
With Lamb, Brown Rice, Carrots, Tomato, Spinach 17800-15498 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
With Chicken, Liver, Peas, Brown Rice, Sweet Potato 17800-16960 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
With Salmon, Sweet Potato, Brown Rice, Spinach 17800-16962 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
With Turkey, Sweet potato, Brown Rice, Spinach 17800-16966 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054

 

Pro Plan Savory Meals—10-oz tubs

Item name UPC code “Best by” date range Production code range
Braised Chicken Entrée 38100-16148 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Braised Pork Entrée 38100-16151 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Braised Turkey Entrée 38100-16147 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Grilled Salmon Entrée 38100-16155 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054
Braised Beef and Rice Entrée 38100-16143 June 2017 to August 2017 5363 to 6054

 

Pet owners who have the recalled product should discontinue feeding it to their pet and contact customer service by calling (800) 877-7019 to request a refund.

No other Purina products or sizes are affected, the company states. Owners who have 10-oz tubs of other brand lines can continue to feed those to their pets.

IMPORTANT PET TREAT RECALL

December 2nd, 2015

Blue Buffalo voluntarily recalls bones due to possible Salmonella contamination

Potentially affected product was sold at PetSmart stores in nine states.
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Dec 01, 2015
By dvm360.com staff

Blue Buffalo is voluntarily recalling one lot of Cub Size Wilderness Wild Chews Bones due to possible Salmonella contamination, according to a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) release. The product was sold beginning on November 19 at PetSmart stores located in California, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. The recalled product comes individually shrink-wrapped with an expiration date of November 4, 2017, printed as “exp 110417 on the plastic wrap and a UPC number of 840243110087, which is located on a sticker, according to the release.

Consumers should look at the UPC code and expiration date to determine if the product they have is subject to the recall. Those who possess affected product are urged to dispose of it or return it to the place of purchase for a refund. Routine testing at the manufacturing site revealed the presence of Salmonella in the product, and no illnesses have been reported to date, the release states.

For additional information or questions contact Blue Buffalo at 888-641-9736 or by emailing bluebuffalo4260@stericycle.com.

IMPORTANT RECALL ON BLUE BUFFALO CAT TREATS

November 12th, 2015

Blue Buffalo recalls cat treats due to possible propylene glycol contamination

Affected product distributed nationwide in the United States and Canada.
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Nov 09, 2015
By dvm360.com staff

Blue Buffalo Co. is voluntarily recalling a small production of Blue Kitty Yums Chicken Recipe Cat Treats that could contain low levels of propylene glycol, which is not permitted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in cat food, according to a company release. Cats who have ingested high doses of propylene glycol may exhibit signs of depression and may experience a loss of coordination, muscle twitching, excessive urination and thirst.

The affected product was distributed nationwide in the United States and Canada through pet specialty stores and e-commerce. It is packaged in a 2-oz plastic standup pouch and is limited to the code dates listed below, according to the release.

Blue Kitty Yums Tasty Chicken Recipe, UPC: 859610007820—best if used by April 24, 2016.
Blue Kitty Yums Tasty Chicken Recipe, UPC: 859610007820—best if used by July 24, 2016.

No other Blue pet foods or treats are involved in this recall. The FDA tested product in response to a singular complaint and found propylene glycol in one bag of cat treats in the impacted lot. Out of caution the company is recalling all treats manufactured in the same lot as the subject bag, the release states.

Consumers who have purchased the product being recalled can return it to the place of purchase for a full refund or contact Blue Buffalo with questions by calling 888-667-1508, or emailing bluebuffalo5883@stericyle.com.

Holiday Goodies Not So Good

December 17th, 2012

I know I preach this every year, but it bears repeating…holiday goodies are not good for your pets.

The holiday season is upon us and with it comes extra temptations in the form of turkeys, chocolates, candies, and various and sundry other goodies.  At the same time comes the temptation to share your bounty with your furry four-legged friends.  But, while humans can afford to indulge themselves a bit, you must be more careful with your pets.  Abrupt dietary changes are the most common cause of gastrointestinal (GI) upset in small animals, especially dogs.  Signs of this disturbance usually include vomiting, diarrhea, and loss of appetite.

 Perhaps more dangerous than just the change in diet, however, are particular foods and treats that your pets should avoid:

 Bones.  Dogs may love bones but bones do not love dogs.  Throwing your dog a bone could be the worst thing you could do to him, as bones can splinter and get hung in his mouth or throat.  If swallowed and digested, bones can cause damage to the intestines.  Chicken, turkey, and pork bones are especially notorious for this.

 Grease.  Foods containing a lot of grease can cause severe GI problems.  One such problem is a condition called pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas, the organ responsible for storage and release of certain digestive enzymes.  In serious cases, hospitalization and aggressive medical therapy are necessary.

 Chocolate.  Dogs and cats should NEVER eat chocolate.  Even in small amounts this treat can be toxic and possibly fatal to your pets.  Baking chocolate is the most dangerous.  For example, for a 10-pound dog it takes only about an ounce of baking chocolate to cause signs of illness.  For the same size dog it would require about 3 ounces of semi-sweet chocolate or about 10 ounces of milk chocolate to cause illness.

 The reason chocolate is so toxic is threefold.  First, it is rapidly absorbed by the body following ingestion.  Therefore, immediate treatment is imperative.  Secondly, chocolate remains in the animal’s system for a very long time.  Thus, once it is absorbed it has a long time to do its damage before the animal can eliminate it.  Lastly, chocolate is dangerous in very small amounts as pointed out previously.

 If your pet shows any signs of GI upset, or if you know he or she has eaten something they shouldn’t, you should immediately contact your veterinarian or local emergency clinic. 

Obviously it is difficult to say no when Fido or Fluffy look at you with those big eyes and ask you to share your holiday feast.  Even my owner is guilty of sneaking a taste of the goods to us dogs.  But it is always something bland and relatively harmless such as white meat, plain breads, or vegetables in small amounts.  Be sure to stay away from the danger foods such as bones, skin, grease, and chocolate. 

By following these guidelines you and your pets can have a happier, healthier holiday season. 

Until next time keep your tail in the air and your nose in the breeze…and have happy holidays!!